object

object
   A material thing. Something to which attention, feeling, thought, or action is directed, therefore usually conceived as subhuman, unreflective and passive, in contrast to the active subject. It is common, for example, for feminist criticism to describe a female nude as the object of the male gaze. Such figures are thus oppressed (see oppression). When the female figure exhibits a less passive personality, as in the painting by Edouard Manet (French, 1832-1883) of Olympia, 1863, oil on canvas, 51 3/8 x 74 3/4 inches (130.5 x 190 cm) Musée d'Orsay, Paris; she is sometimes described as a subject, at least with respect to the single issue of her gaze.

Glossary of Art Terms. 2014.

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  • Object — may refer to: Object (philosophy), a thing, being or concept Entity, something that is tangible and within the grasp of the senses As used in object relations theories of psychoanalysis, that to which a subject relates. Object (grammar), a… …   Wikipedia

  • Object — Ob ject ([o^]b j[e^]kt), n. [L. objectus. See {Object}, v. t.] 1. That which is put, or which may be regarded as put, in the way of some of the senses; something visible or tangible and persists for an appreciable time; as, he observed an object… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • object — ob·ject 1 / äb jikt/ n 1: something toward which thought, feeling, or action is directed see also natural object 2: the purpose or goal of something; esp in the civil law of Louisiana: the purpose for which a contract or obligation is formed… …   Law dictionary

  • Object-Z — is an object oriented extension to the Z notation developed at the University of Queensland, Australia. Object Z extends Z by the addition of language constructs resembling the object oriented paradigm, most notably, classes. Other object… …   Wikipedia

  • Object 47 — Studio album by Wire Released July 7th 2008 …   Wikipedia

  • object — object, objective nouns. Both words have the meaning ‘something sought or aimed at’ and in practice they are often interchangeable, although object is more common when followed by a qualifying construction, e.g. one with in or of (and is… …   Modern English usage

  • object — [äb′jikt, äbjekt; ] for v. [ əb jekt′, äbjekt′] n. [ME < ML objectum, something thrown in the way < L objectus, a casting before, that which appears, orig. pp. of objicere < ob (see OB ) + jacere, to throw: see JET1] 1. a thing that can… …   English World dictionary

  • Object — Ob*ject ([o^]b*j[e^]kt ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Objected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Objecting}.] [L. objectus, p. p. of objicere, obicere, to throw or put before, to oppose; ob (see {Ob }) + jacere to throw: cf. objecter. See {Jet} a shooting forth.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • object# — object n 1 *thing, article Analogous words: *affair, concern, matter, thing: *form, figure, shape, configuration 2 objective, goal, end, aim, design, purpose, *intention, intent Analogous words: * …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Object V — EP by Leaether Strip Released 1991 …   Wikipedia

  • object — the noun [14] and object the verb [15] have diverged considerably over the centuries, but they come from the same ultimate source: Latin obicere. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix ob ‘towards’ and jacere ‘throw’ (source of English… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

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